Goodreads Review: Mother’s Day with Snowman Paul by Yossi Lapid

Mother's Day with Snowman PaulMother’s Day with Snowman Paul by Yossi Lapid

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I first read this book a year ago right before Mother’s Day. Mothers are still under-appreciated in our society, even by their own families. So sad we need a day to make up for all the times throughout the year we take our mothers for granted. 😦 This book helps us all remember to be thankful for our mothers, including our shared mother—Mother Nature herself.

I’ll say what I said back then—Snowman Paul books remind me of the story/song Frosty the Snowman and another book I’ve reviewed, the pictures-only book from Raymond Briggs, The Snowman. Like Frosty and Briggs’ Snowman, Snowman Paul doesn’t care what others may judge him as and he lives his life purely from love. The watercolor illustrations are just gorgeous, and they capture the joy of Paul and Dan’s friendship. These books may be short, but they are long on heart and soul. I know it’s spring now, but let’s make every day a Snow(man Paul) day!

🙂
Lia
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Goodreads Review: A Ray Red

A Ray RedA Ray Red by Art Elbin

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This unusual protagonist, a red ray of light, has a timeless struggle—finding one’s place within society.

I love sharing stories with my kids, whether it be reading or listening to the same book or watching a movie or play together. My middle-schooler and I read this advance reader copy aloud. (Disclaimer: my picture book series and A Ray Red are both published by Nettle Rabbit Books.)

This quick read is unique, not only for its characters and locations, but for how it’s formatted. The color words and the rays’ names are identified with their highlighted colors, and type styles (small caps, ALL CAPS, bold, italic) and even w o r d s p r e a d i n g are used to show different effects and feelings.

The ending is my daughter’s favorite part, but she can’t elaborate because it would require a spoiler alert! (A voracious reader, she is constantly rereading the Harry Potter books, and she loves popular YA dystopian and vampire series.)

Last weekend we finally read the expanded prologue (included in the final eBook) that explains and sets up the soul ray’s world and problem. Now my daughter’s curious—what did the original soul ray do that was so bad he chose to be reformed into a new ray? The main character, Arr, knows nothing of his former existence before A Ray Red begins, and he’s a newbie at everything. It’s hard to be patient with a first-person narrative because we learn new facts only when he does!

This young YA book highlights the rule I’ve been teaching my kids forever—you can choose anything (wisely or not), but you will be accountable for your actions. All in all, this coming-of-age story is inspiring and thought-provoking and has a literal spiritual awakening.

🙂

Lia

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Goodreads Reviews: Three books by Sarah Mazor

Queen Esther's Big Secret: A Purim Story (Jewish Holiday Books for Children Book 4)Queen Esther’s Big Secret: A Purim Story by Sarah Mazor

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A book teaching the meaning behind a long-standing holiday should be engaging and relatable to today’s children. Queen Esther’s Big Secret is both. I love the rhyming lines and the rich illustrations and was grateful that this story has a happy ending.

“Have You Ever Seen?”: Help Kids Go to Sleep With a Smile by Sarah Mazor

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This cute rhyming bedtime story plays with color and type sizes and is fun for all ages. The illustrations are perfect for each rhyme. The rhyme riddles at the back of the book are a great bonus. It also includes a preview of Meow Said the Cow, the second book in Auntie Lily’s Ready to Read series. Check out all the books from Auntie Lily—‘cause she is super at being silly.

Once Upon a Time: Bedtime with a Smile Picture Books (Bedtime Stories with Uncle Willy Book 1)Once Upon a Time: Bedtime with a Smile Picture Books by Sarah Mazor

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Another rhyming book by Sarah Mazor animates household items and animals in silly situations. All “stories” are told by a jovial Uncle Willy. The book also has riddles to solve that are easy for young rhymers. I liked the question after each riddle asking kids to name four more answers in the same category as their answer. It gets the kids (and adults) thinking.
🙂
Lia
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Goodreads Review: I Love You! by Calee M. Lee

I Love You!I Love You! by Calee M. Lee

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Perfect for bilingual households! The cute corkboard layout and crisp illustrations by Tricia Tharp were the best parts in this imaginative narrative of a parent’s love for a child. I can’t help wondering if some illustrations were a literal translation from either Spanish or English. But because the imagery of the story was sometimes odd, I can now picture a “secret’s ear” and a “magic cave” out of pillows.

🙂
Lia

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Goodreads Review: Pop the Bubble! by Mary Eakin

Pop the Bubble!Pop the Bubble! by Mary Eakin

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Exactly what a board book for young ones should be—beautiful and interactive! The author-illustrator creates a simple storyline with a muted palette. I love the circular leaves on the tree! (Don’t forget—trees are ticklish!) However, this book would be better read in print form. In the eBook, you can’t turn it upside down because it won’t let you. It will flip to the same orientation. And drawing on the screen is impossible because it makes the page move with your finger. But Pop the Bubble! is still a sweet read.

🙂
Lia
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Five FREE Days for Tess and Bella on Amazon (February 14 – 18, 2019)!

Five days of FREE! Download the first two books in The Chronicles of the Clothes Mind series, Tess the Princess Dress and Bella the Umbrella

from Valentine’s Day to Presidents’ Day (February 14 – 18, 2019)!

Please share this post with anyone with little ones who like Kindle eBooks.  And if you like the book(s), please review on Amazon.  Thank you in advance!

Happy Reading!

🙂

Lia

Goodreads Review: The Book of Sight

The Book of Sight (The Book of Sight #1)The Book of Sight by Deborah Dunlevy

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The first in this magical YA series captures the mysterious and bonding effect of the Book when it arrives in the mail for each of these teens in a sleepy town. When they finally find each other and its secrets start to be revealed, the stakes are higher, and the danger intensifies. They must rely on each of their strengths to uncover the truths and stay safe. I liked the Book itself, but as an adult, I worried immediately about the magic it came from. The relationships between the newfound friends are dynamic and flow naturally through the events of the story. Boring, this book is not!
🙂
Lia
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Goodreads Review: Crisanta Knight: Protagonist Bound

Protagonist Bound (Crisanta Knight #1)Protagonist Bound by Geanna Culbertson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Teen rebelling against social station? Check! Tomboy girl who likes boots, not glass slippers? Check! A cheeky first-person narrative? Check! A cast of like-minded friends? Check! Based on favorite fairy tale characters? Check! I love this because it’s familiar and fun (and I love the concept since I love Disney and their Descendants stories). Fun adventure tales for the girl who doesn’t want to be told how to act or be pigeonholed as a pretty, privileged princess. I only read the first in this series, but I can tell that the rest will be just as fast-paced and endearing.

🙂
Lia

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Goodreads Review: Adulthood Is a Myth: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection

Adulthood Is a Myth: A Sarah's Scribbles CollectionAdulthood Is a Myth: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I normally wouldn’t recommend this comic strip collection to children (since it’s marketed to the new adult market). However, while I was reading this by myself, two of my kids joined me (the middle schoolers) and wouldn’t leave until we read the whole book together, silently side-by-side.

Sarah’s adult-themed musings are very attractive to preteen and young teens because they are curious about learning the real stuff of growing up and they relate to feeling unprepared to take on adult responsibilities. And it doesn’t hurt that this book is packaged in a graphic novel style and extremely funny to boot!

🙂 Lia

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